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About NUCLEAR ENERGY

"Welcome to the Center for all Jobs Nuclear."


The nuclear industry is the most highly capitalized industry worldwide, and one that offers professionals an exceptional career future, with exceptional pay.

We designed our website to provide job seekers and professionals in the nuclear industry, a central resource to access current employment opportunities in this ever growing nuclear industry.

We are an international job board and job index for all nuclear jobs, including nuclear energy jobs, nuclear medicine jobs, nuclear chemistry jobs, nuclear engineering jobs, nuclear power jobs, nuclear power plant jobs, nuclear construction jobs, nuclear technician jobs, nuclear plant jobs, nuclear security jobs, nuclear medicine technologist jobs, nuclear energy jobs, nuclear pharmacy jobs, nuclear engineer jobs, nuclear operator jobs, nuclear medical technologist jobs, nuclear medicine physician jobs, nuclear medicine technologies jobs, nuclear pharmacist jobs, and nuclear physics jobs.

Why go Nuclear?

Nuclear Energy or Atom Energy is the energy trapped inside an atom, and is considered the sustainable and limitless power source of the future. Not only is nuclear power the most reliable energy resource, it creates little or no greenhouse gases or pollution, produces far more energy than carbon-based fuels, is a reliable source of energy (reactors that spend little down time), cost effective when a standardized reactor design is used, and produces little waste. New reactor designs make it a renewable resource (breeder reactors), and advances are being made with new safe sources of fuel such as thorium (which is greater in abundance than uranium, cleaner, safer and provides less waste production).

Nuclear Medicine is the safe use of radioactive materials in the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. Nuclear medicine can identify abnormalities early in the progression of a disease - long before some medical problems are apparent with other diagnostic tests. This allows a disease to be treated early in its course when there may be a more successful prognosis. Nuclear medicine imaging documents organ function and structure. It is a way to gather medical information that may otherwise be unavailable, require surgery, or necessitate more expensive diagnostic tests.

Nuclear Medicine is a quarter-trillion dollar industry that treats many illnesses, saves thousands of lives each year, and is one of the leading medical advancements of the twentieth century. Treating cancer and disease, and tracing substances through the body with medical isotopes (radioactive isotopes) is one of medicine's most valuable diagnostic tools.

What about Nuclear Waste?

In reality there is no such thing as Nuclear Wastes, since almost 100% of spent nuclear fuel is recyclable and can be re-utilized as nuclear fuel by fast spectrum reactors or breeder reactors, or mixed with highly enriched fission products into mixed oxide fuel (MOX fuel) to be burned by existing nuclear reactors. Over 95% of a spent fuel rod is natural uranium-238 which comes right out of the earth, the other 5% is more radioactive but is invaluable to nuclear medicine (almost 45% of ALL medical procedures today now involve some kind of radioactive isotopes), and in various industrial processes (reducing ash content in coal, obtaining accurate measurements with radioactive gauges, and in diagnostics using gamma-emitting tracers to photograph images of machinery and structural defects or to identify potential oil reserves). Any nuclear fuel not utilized can be recycled, stored safely underground, or disposed of permanently in space or deep within the earth's molten core.

Why seek a Nuclear Career?



The nuclear industry is a robust and growing field in both energy, and medicine. America will continue to consume greater amounts of power, and nuclear energy is a critical means to meeting that demand, affordably and reliably without contributing to climate change. The nuclear industry generates over $50 billion each year in electricity sales, and billions in medical diagnostics and treatments. Nuclear utilities and nuclaer energy companies, nuclear engineering and nuclear research firms, medical and healthcare organizations all need professional nuclear workers across a broad range of disciplines.

The future is bright for jobseekers looking to advance their careers in the growing nuclear industry.

What are some Position Titles and Job Descriptions for the Nuclear Industry?

Below is a brief listing and description of several position titles and job descriptions within the nuclear industry:

Nuclear Technicians: Nuclear technicians assist physicists, engineers, and other professionals in nuclear research and nuclear production. They operate special equipment used in these activities and monitor the levels of radiation that are produced.

Nuclear Chemistry Technicians: A chemistry technician measures and records plant chemistry and radioactivity levels, and operates chemical and radiochemical instrumentation and equipment.

Nuclear Electrical Technicians: An electrical technician’s duties consist of the maintenance and repair of highly complex electrical/electronic equipment required for a nuclear plant. Responsibilities include troubleshooting, testing and inspecting in a highly skilled manner.

Nuclear Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Technicians: An I&C technician is responsible for calibrating, testing, troubleshooting, reworking, modifying and inspecting nuclear plant instrumentation and control components and systems.

Nuclear Mechanical Technicians: A mechanical technician performs preventive, corrective and special maintenance on systems, components and structural facilities to ensure the reliability of a nuclear power plant.

Nuclear Radiation Therapists: Radiation therapists treat cancer and other diseases in patients by giving radiation treatments.

Nuclear Hazardous Materials Removal Workers: Hazardous materials (hazmat) removal workers identify and dispose of asbestos, radioactive and nuclear waste, arsenic, lead, and other hazardous materials. They also clean up materials that are flammable, corrosive, reactive, or toxic.

Nuclear Security Officers: Security officers are responsible for maintaining security at nuclear stations by controlling access, monitoring and testing security and communications systems and ensuring company requirements are enforced. Other duties include: • Under the guidance of more experienced staff, nuclear security officers prevent and protect against radiological sabotage. • Security Officers will learn nuclear defense tactics, security policies and procedures, and gain tactical work experience. • Officers operate, monitor and program electronic security and communications systems. • Officers respond to, assess, and investigate alarms, special conditions, emergency situations and security contingencies; provide compensatory measures for failed or degraded security safeguards. • Officers will search vehicles, personnel and possessions prior to entry to station. • Nuclear security officers serve as members of the armed response force by implementing assigned portions of the protective strategy as directed, and may coordinate communications with local fire, rescue and law enforcement agencies. • Officers control access to and patrol protected/vital areas. • Officers test all security related equipment, including communications systems, detectors, x-ray screening devices, alarm systems, in vital as well as non-vital areas. • Officers prepare required security reports using a computer system and maintain security documentation, including documentation for electronic security systems and hardware.

Nuclear Pharmacists: Under the direction of a physician, compounds and dispenses radiopharmaceutical drugs to medical care providers. Responsible for procuring, compounding, dispensing, and distributing radiopharmaceuticals. Requires a bachelor's degree and/or an advanced degree in pharmacy and is licensed to practice. Must have completed a program in nuclear pharmacy. Familiar with standard concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Typically reports to a manager or supervisor. A certain degree of creativity and latitude is required.

Nuclear Engineers: Nuclear engineers research and develop the processes, instruments, and systems used to get benefits from nuclear energy and radiation. Many of these engineers find industrial and medical uses for radioactive materials—for example, in equipment used in medical diagnosis and treatment.

Nuclear Engineer IV: Designs and initiates processes to gain benefit from nuclear energy and radiation. Conducts research into problems of nuclear energy systems. Designs and develops nuclear equipment. Monitors testing, operation, and maintenance of nuclear reactors. Requires a graduate degree in area of specialty and 6-8 years of experience in the field or in a related area. Familiar with a variety of the field's concepts, practices, and procedures. Relies on extensive experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Leads and directs the work of others. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected. Typically reports to a manager or head of a unit/department.

Nuclear Engineer IV: Provides expert judgment and analysis for the design, development and implementation of technical products and systems. Resolves highly complex technical issues and conducts advanced research. Recommends alterations to development and design to improve quality of products and/or procedures. Requires a bachelor's degree in engineering and 6-8 years of experience in the field or in a related area. Familiar with a variety of the field's concepts, practices, and procedures. Relies on extensive experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Leads and directs the work of others. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected. May report to an executive or a manager.

Nuclear Engineer III: Designs and initiates processes to gain benefit from nuclear energy and radiation. Conducts research into problems of nuclear energy systems. Designs and develops nuclear equipment. Monitors testing, operation, and maintenance of nuclear reactors. Requires a graduate degree in engineering and 4-6 years of experience in the field or in a related area. Familiar with a variety of the field's concepts, practices, and procedures. Relies on experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of complicated tasks. May report to an executive or a manager. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected.

Nuclear Engineer II: Designs and initiates processes to gain benefit from nuclear energy and radiation. Conducts research into problems of nuclear energy systems. Designs and develops nuclear equipment. Monitors testing, operation, and maintenance of nuclear reactors. Requires a bachelor's degree in engineering and 2-4 years of experience in the field or in a related area. Familiar with standard concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on limited experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Works under general supervision; typically reports to a supervisor or manager. A certain degree of creativity and latitude is required

Nuclear Engineer I: Designs and initiates processes to gain benefit from nuclear energy and radiation. Conducts research into problems of nuclear energy systems. Designs and develops nuclear equipment. Monitors testing, operation, and maintenance of nuclear reactors. May require a bachelor's degree in engineering and 0-2 years of experience in the field or in a related area. Has knowledge of commonly-used concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on instructions and pre-established guidelines to perform the functions of the job. Works under immediate supervision. Primary job functions do not typically require exercising independent judgment. Typically reports to a supervisor or manager.

Nuclear Physicist: A physicist who specializes in nuclear physics. Nuclear physics is the field of physics that studies the constituents and interactions of atomic nuclei. The most commonly known applications of nuclear physics are nuclear power generation and nuclear weapons technology, but the research has provided application in many fields, including those in nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging, ion implantation in materials engineering, and radiocarbon dating in geology and archaeology.

Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Nuclear power plant operators, distributors, and dispatchers control the systems that generate and distribute electric power. A non-licensed operator supports the reactor operators and senior reactor operators. Duties include opening and closing valves, electrical breakers and other devices as well as directly monitoring plant equipment performance. Operators work in shifts.

Radiation Protection Technicians: Radiation protection technicians measure and record radiation levels; in addition, they service and calibrate radiation protection instruments and equipment. They play a vital role in ensuring the safety of employees working in radiation areas, as well as the facility’s compliance with radiation requirements.

Reactor Operators: A reactor operator, licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is responsible for operating a reactor’s controls in cooperation with the remainder of the shift team. The reactor operator moves control rods, starts and stops equipment, implements operations procedures, conducts surveillance tests and records data in logs. Operators work in shifts.

Senior Reactor Operators: A senior reactor operation is licensed to operate a nuclear power plant in accordance with all regulations. Duties include operating the mechanical, electrical and reactor systems from the plant control room in a safe and efficient manner to ensure maximum electrical generation in compliance with regulations.

Nuclear Medicine Technologists: Nuclear medicine technologists use a scanner to create images of various areas of a patient’s body. They prepare radioactive drugs and administer them to patients undergoing the scans. The radioactive drugs cause abnormal areas of the body to appear different from normal areas in the images.

Nuclear Medicine Technicians: Provides diagnostic aid to physicians by conducting organ or body scans on patients. Administers and records isotope dosages in accordance with established departmental protocol. Observes patients during procedures and reports any abnormal activity. Typically requires a bachelor's degree, at least 2 years of experience in radiology, and registration with the Nuclear Medicine Technology certification Board, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (A.R.R.T.), or the American Society of Clinical Pathology. Familiar with standard concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Works under general supervision. A certain degree of creativity and latitude is required. Typically reports to a chief technologist or manager.

Nuclear Medicine Physicians: Uses radioactive materials to diagnose and treat disease. Monitors quality control of radionuclide preparation, administration and disposition, and ensures that all activities comply with the standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Instructs and directs nuclear medicine technologists regarding desired dosages, techniques, positions, and projections. Requires a degree in medicine from an accredited school and is licensed to practice. May require at least 2-4 years of nuclear medicine experience. Familiar with standard concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected. May report to a medical director.

Chief Nuclear Medicine Technologists: Provides administrative oversight for the nuclear medical technology department of a hospital. Reviews, develops and implements technical policies and procedures to ensure efficiency, quality and compliance with all regulatory requirements. Supervises nuclear medicine technologists, and may perform the functions of a technologist as needed. Ensures proper usage, maintenance and updates of medical equipment. Requires a bachelor's degree with at least 5 years of experience in radiology. Expected to meet certain state certifications. Familiar with a variety of the field's concepts, practices, and procedures. Relies on extensive experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of complex tasks. Leads and directs the work of others. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is required. Typically reports to top management.

Radiation Physicists: Ensures the quality of care in the use of radiation-producing sources and imaging equipment and the protection of patients and staff from radiation. Calibrates all radiation therapy equipment, conducts X-ray machine performance surveys, and implements procedures to ensure quality control for electronic imaging devices. May require an advanced degree in radiation physics and at least 5 years of direct experience in the field. Familiar with a variety of the field's concepts, practices, and procedures. Relies on extensive experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Leads and directs the work of others. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected. Typically reports to a manager or head of a unit/department.

Radiation Therapy Physicians: Uses radiation to treat patients with cancer. Develops an individual treatment plan based on the patient's medical history, physical examination, review of laboratory tests, X-ray studies, and biopsies. Works with medical radiation physicists and dosimetrists to calculate and deliver the exact dose of radiation to the cancer tissue. Requires a degree in medicine from an accredited school and is licensed to practice. May require at least 2-4 years of radiation therapy experience. Familiar with standard concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected. May report to a medical director.

Radiation Therapy Dosimetrists: Calculates computerized isodose plans for radiation oncology patients. Computes standard dose calculations and determines computerized generation of isodose curves for external beam hyperthermia and brachytherapy radiation treatment programs. Calculates treatment machine settings, documents calculations, and records treatment data in therapy chart. Requires a bachelor's degree in the physical or biological sciences, must be registered in Radiation Therapy Technology, and must have completed a one-year program in Medical Dosimetry. Familiar with a variety of the field's concepts, practices, and procedures. Relies on extensive experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. May lead and direct the work of others. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected. Typically reports to a manager or head of a unit/department.

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